What is IDEA?

Founded by people with enthusiasm with programming, the CRHS Innovation and Development Association (IDEA) is an organization focused on advancing students beyond the school’s object-oriented programming to bring software development to Cinco Ranch High School students.

Our Mission.

We seek to create an environment where students with an interest in CS/software can thrive and learn valuable real world skills. No previous coding knowledge required. (copy from purpose of our club submitted to school)

What We Do

BEGINNER LEARNING

We work with anyone who wants to get into coding to quickly get them on the right track. Our teaching is fast-paced but fun.

COMPETITIVE PROGRAMMING

We participate in a variety of competitive programming contests such as HP CodeWars or the US Computing Olympiad and prepare students for these competitions.

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

We also have a focus on software development, preparing students for real-world jobs. Students can learn mobile app development, video game development, and even Artificial Intelligence.

Joining is Super Easy
That's great, but what if...
I don't know programming

It’s perfectly fine to have no programming experience when you join the club. You can start with Java then advance to software development. We will help you from start to end and add more autonomy as you continue.

I don't know what a hackathon is

A hackathon isn’t really what the name implies. While the term “hack” you are used to is the run of the mill usage of exploits, brute force, and malicious access to one’s advantage. Although this definition partially applies as some hackathons have capture the flag (finding an answer through hacking) competitions, it mostly implies “hack” as in life hacks. The main goal of the hackathon is the viability and execution of an idea. Think of this as a startup competition.

Missed the deadline

What deadline? There is no deadline. You can join anytime, and we’ll catch you up.

I Don't have the resources

There is no entry fee for this club. However, you will need a (non-ChromeOS) laptop as in-person hackathons do require you to have a computer that can run an Integrated Development Environment. If you cannot get a laptop, some hackathons have a loan system where you can borrow high performance laptops provided by sponsors of the event.

Our Projects

30+ Projects and Counting

TidePool

I’ll admit, I’m sort of amazed we haven’t covered this at the HMS Jalopiesnick before, because this is precisely the kind of automotive idiocy that gets all of my delight glands nice and excorpulated. The car I want to tell you about isn’t a particularly interesting car, but it was closely related to a good, honest general-use car, the 2002 to 2004 Toyota Matrix. You may also recall that the Toyota Corolla-platform’d Matrix was also sold by GM, who built (at the joint Toyota-GM NUMMI plant) a Pontiac-branded version called the Vibe. But did you know these twins were actually triplets? The often-forgotten sibling is called the Toyota Voltz, and it needs some explanation.

CapsuleMap

Despite the confusing name, the Voltz was not electric, well, no more so than any other car that has spark plugs and a radio. The Voltz was just like the Pontiac Vibe, a slightly re-styled and very re-badged Toyota Matrix. Now I bet you’re already starting to notice something weird going on here. The re-badged Toyota was...badged as a...Toyota?

Greenway

Yes, yes it was. And, even better, this re-badged Toyota was actually a re-badge of the Pontiac, which was a re-badge of a Toyota. I’ll give you a moment to mop up the brain-splatter from your shirt and immediate area. For some deeply confusing reasons, Toyota didn’t want to sell the Toyota Matrix in Japan, but they were fine selling the mechanically-identical but re-styled Pontiac Vibe there, only they couldn’t really sell it under the Pontiac name there, since, you know, Toyota isn’t Pontiac, so they re-badged the Vibe as the Toyota Voltz.

Memory Notes

They didn’t change anything about the Vibe’s styling at all, so all of the GM-designed body panels, even the Pontiac’s signature split grille, remained. Hell, even the shape of the Pontiac logo remained, just replaced with a similar Isosceles-triangle-shaped badge, but this time a “V” for “Voltz” and definitely not “Vibe.” Weirdly, this is the second time I can think of the Pontiac logo shaped being replaced with another badge on an imported car sold as a Pontiac. The Voltz was sold at Toyota’s Netz dealerships/stores, part of Toyota’s kind of baffling differentiation of models into different types of dealership outlets that I think target different market segments, with Netz seeming to skew younger. You can see the Netz branding in this bonkers Voltz commercial that features weird, scary CG mannequins instead of actual humans. Huh, it seems those mannequins were the work of an artist named Eric So, so maybe that’s more of A Thing than I realize.

Cultivate

The RHD interior seemed to pull more parts from the Matrix than the Vibe, just to keep things nice and confusing. It’s all so strange, and reveals so much about the inherent madness of badge engineering. Because this strange ouroboros of a car is a Toyota re-badged as a Pontiac re-badged as a Toyota. Has there ever been another car to be badge-engineered back to its origin company before? I don’t think so. So, everyone, take in the majestic madness of the Toyota Voltz, and take some sort of lesson from its example, somehow.

ProFit

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Bot Dilemma

I’ll admit, I’m sort of amazed we haven’t covered this at the HMS Jalopiesnick before, because this is precisely the kind of automotive idiocy that gets all of my delight glands nice and excorpulated. The car I want to tell you about isn’t a particularly interesting car, but it was closely related to a good, honest general-use car, the 2002 to 2004 Toyota Matrix. You may also recall that the Toyota Corolla-platform’d Matrix was also sold by GM, who built (at the joint Toyota-GM NUMMI plant) a Pontiac-branded version called the Vibe. But did you know these twins were actually triplets? The often-forgotten sibling is called the Toyota Voltz, and it needs some explanation.

SkillQuest

Despite the confusing name, the Voltz was not electric, well, no more so than any other car that has spark plugs and a radio. The Voltz was just like the Pontiac Vibe, a slightly re-styled and very re-badged Toyota Matrix. Now I bet you’re already starting to notice something weird going on here. The re-badged Toyota was...badged as a...Toyota?

Climate Change Central

Yes, yes it was. And, even better, this re-badged Toyota was actually a re-badge of the Pontiac, which was a re-badge of a Toyota. I’ll give you a moment to mop up the brain-splatter from your shirt and immediate area. For some deeply confusing reasons, Toyota didn’t want to sell the Toyota Matrix in Japan, but they were fine selling the mechanically-identical but re-styled Pontiac Vibe there, only they couldn’t really sell it under the Pontiac name there, since, you know, Toyota isn’t Pontiac, so they re-badged the Vibe as the Toyota Voltz.

Open-Sourced Olafs Pod Site

They didn’t change anything about the Vibe’s styling at all, so all of the GM-designed body panels, even the Pontiac’s signature split grille, remained. Hell, even the shape of the Pontiac logo remained, just replaced with a similar Isosceles-triangle-shaped badge, but this time a “V” for “Voltz” and definitely not “Vibe.” Weirdly, this is the second time I can think of the Pontiac logo shaped being replaced with another badge on an imported car sold as a Pontiac. The Voltz was sold at Toyota’s Netz dealerships/stores, part of Toyota’s kind of baffling differentiation of models into different types of dealership outlets that I think target different market segments, with Netz seeming to skew younger. You can see the Netz branding in this bonkers Voltz commercial that features weird, scary CG mannequins instead of actual humans. Huh, it seems those mannequins were the work of an artist named Eric So, so maybe that’s more of A Thing than I realize.

HealthID

The RHD interior seemed to pull more parts from the Matrix than the Vibe, just to keep things nice and confusing. It’s all so strange, and reveals so much about the inherent madness of badge engineering. Because this strange ouroboros of a car is a Toyota re-badged as a Pontiac re-badged as a Toyota. Has there ever been another car to be badge-engineered back to its origin company before? I don’t think so. So, everyone, take in the majestic madness of the Toyota Voltz, and take some sort of lesson from its example, somehow.

Trash on the Map

Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro Doug Demuro